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directly at odds with house speaker john boehner. >> could you accept a deal that does not include tax rate increases for the wealthy? we've seen talk about a possible compromise that could leave rates the same but cap deductions for high-income earners. is that something that's acceptable? >> no. >> not at all no, way? >> no. the preponderance made it very clear in his campaign that there are not enough -- what you just described is a formula and a blueprint for hampering our future. you cannot go forward -- you have to cut some investments. if you cut too many you are hampering growth, you're hampering education, investments for the future. >> and even thousands of miles away it appears president obama is still focused on those negotiations. while touring a royal monastery with secretary of state clinton in thailand the president was overheard mentioning the budget talks to a monk. the president later clarified his comments -- >> he's not any monk. >> no. >> he has some big i vestments in the stock market. >> he later clarified his comments at a news conference. >> yes, we were working on
of those things need to be in play. when john boehner talks about raising revenue he's willing to do that if it only comes in the form of tax reform, not raising tax rates, but actually lore erring tax rates, closing loopholes, broadening the base and you will get more money coming into the treasury. the other part of the equation that is so important which has not been part of the public conversation is cutting spending, not just slowing the rate of growth but actually cutting spending to try to get this deficit under control. i know the republicans don't control the narrative on this but i want to hear more from them on that side of the equation. jon: julie our nodding your head you must agree. >> i think both sides need to come to the table. enough already with these sort of, you know, showmanship, game man ship, these are people's lives that are at stake in this economy. monica is right in that the president does control the upper hand at this point. if nothing is done all the bush tax rates will expire. you have exit polling coming out of the recent election saying two-thirds of
.6 trillion of new revenue. boehner had agreed to $800 billion. it's not hard to find $1.2 trillion as a kind of middle ground to that. then you want to have $4 trillion of total deficit reduction, so that leaves $2.8 trillion of spending reductions that have to happen. here's what people miss. we can avoid going over the cliff with the stroke of a pen. they can just extend all this stuff and kick the can down the road. the real question is are we going to have a big deal? are we going to agree on the major spending restraints that we need as well as the tax stuff in order to actually get the deficit under control? and i think the betting on that is less than 50%. i think we have a great shot at it. but it's going to be really, really hard. >> is that the view from wall street, too? they're not totally confident that this is going to happen? >> what you see in the stock market at the moment is that wall street is not totally confident. that's for sure. >> all right. steve, thanks so much. >> pleasure. >>> coming up, independent senator-elect of maine, angus king joins the conversation. he's a
and the ongoing relationship with boehner and mcconnell because he's going to have to be a different kind of leader with them. he talked about it in the press conference a bit the other day. he needs to reach out to them the way he's reached out to people on staten island and dealt with the two governors, christie and cuomo, who are two pretty demanding guys as well. and based on their public and private comments have been very happy with the president's leadership and his government. >> i just wonder if it's fair to make a parallel when you look at the president's response to sandy which has had and continues to have just devastating effects on the economy for businesses and the reaction to the bp oil spill which seemed slow in coming because that was devastating as well to a different part of the country. >> he certainly was. he was very slow to respond to people in the gulf coast. >> in terms of appearances. >> i think things have changed, though, over the past couple years. and i suspect that, you know, even the president's closest allies will say that it was a very hard adjustment go
the microphone with pelosi and with reid and boehner at the side saying that revenue is on the table, but when the talks ramp back up after thanksgiving, is this an issue to be real negotiation or dig-in time? >> i hope it is time for a negotiation. look, if there is one thing that we learned from the president's campaign, he promised to raise taxes on the wealthy. and here is a news flash to the republicans out there, elections have consequences, and that is what he wants to do, and i'm sure he is going to accomplish some of that, but on either side when you dig in before the negotiations start, not only does it look bad, it makes the markets go up and down, and it creates instability, and insecurity among the people out here in the country feeling the pain and the brunt of some of the economic policies and the fact of the matter is that both sides need to come into it with some level of give and take, and that is how you govern and get it done, and if the president is going to ak kccomplish the polis that he did in first term that he promised in the second, he is going to have to get some of
connell and john boehner's people sort of drawing their lines in the sand. that's not really happening even though that is sort of by far much sort of bigger story as far as what's going to happen in the country. as far as -- and priority list for both the white house and congress. >> do you think they also get that at the white house? that as long as -- as much as they may be getting hurt or not by the islamist people are talking about benghazi, it enables some room for the white house to get involved in the negotiations as well. >> it allows them to negotiate this without sort of a spotlight on fiscal cliff story which is -- you know, a story that has about six weeks left in it before some -- before taxes go up on everyone and significant spending cuts happen across the country. not just the military. >> you've been covering the hill for awhile in addition to the campaigns. do you get the sense that this will be the time when they say okay, they've reached some agreement on the tax out on the revenue side and republicans eat i
. and despite that, john boehner believes that a solution is possible. take a listen. >> i've outlined a framework for how both parties can work together to avert the fiscal cliff without raising tax rates. if you've look closely at what the president had to say and look closely at what i've had to say, there are no barriers here to sitting down and beginning to work through this process. >> when it comes to those tax hikes, though, the president saying that 98% of americans would not see their taxes go up, that 97% of small businesses would not be impacted at all. he does see some room there to close loopholes for some tax reforms but he doesn't believe that that's enough to make up that trillion dollars, and that the math simply doesn't add up. so what the president wants is a comprehensive plan so that middle-class americans are not hurt. zoraida? >> let's move on to the heated back and forth over u.n. ambassador susan rice. republican senators john mccain and lindsey graham say they would actually try to block rice from being promoted to secretary of state should she be nominated.
. john boehner still in the house for the time being at the treasury. the president is back in the white house and harry reid is in the senate with a few more seats. why should i believe this would end any more positively than the summer of 2011? >> because again i'm not going to try to talk to you in optimism but let's look at what's changed. you have republican leadership acknowledging for the first time in this debate in public that it's agreed to increase in revenues as part of an agreement that helps restore fiscal balance. that's a very important change. you can debate on what motivated that change, and of course it's true that approach has been a popular very substantial support among the american people. you have a much greater recognition that the economy would benefit on a carefully designed balanced agreement on fiscal reform and putting it off indefinitely is not good for the country. that's important, too. and i also think again if you listen carefully to what people are saying and what many politicians are saying with many elected representatives are saying there's a lot of
between now and the first of the year. >> and on the house side, it's clear that boehner is sending a message to fellow republicans in the house who have got to make extra steps that we didn't before. >> i think that's true. and i think the president has responded by saying that i'm not whetted to the idea of tax rate increases. i'll settle for more revenue if that's what i can get. >> you got senators reid and mcconnell to actually sit together. >> it was like arranging the paris pease talks or the camp david talks. it wasn't easy. >> were they as uncomfortable as they looked sitting next to each other? >> yes. >> and what did you learn from that? >> well, i think that -- what can you say? they don't strike me as two guys that are -- can sit down in a room over a whiskey and kind of work things out. they're very locked in their ways and they are both political tacticians. that's what they do. >> they are brilliant political tacticians. anybody who knows senator mcconnell and reid knows that. they're both very good at what they do, and outmaneuvering one another, which raises the qu
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

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